Introducing Our New CISO Alex Stamos

By Jay Rossiter, SVP of Platforms & Personalization Products

At Yahoo, we’re focused on having the absolute best talent in place to provide our users with outstanding product experiences. Part of that experience is the trust that consumers put in us to keep their personal data secure. This trust is critical to our brand and is critical to our commitment to the hundreds of millions of users who make our products part of their daily habits. That’s why I’m thrilled to welcome Alex Stamos to Yahoo as our new VP of Information Security (CISO) reporting directly to me. Alex will lead all aspects of information security at Yahoo, including our team of Yahoo “Paranoids”, charged with making our products as secure as possible. This is a broad role which includes implementing top-to-bottom security for our products and systems but also to lead the company and the industry in not just how security works today but how it needs to work in the future.

Alex has spent his career building and improving secure, trustworthy systems and is a well-known expert on Internet infrastructure, cloud computing and mobile security. Most recently, he served as the CTO of Artemis and co-founded iSEC Partners. He has been a keynote speaker at FS-ISAC, was a key organizer of TrustyCon, and is frequently requested to present at conferences such as BlackHat, DEF CON, Microsoft Blue Hat and Infragard. He holds a BSEE from the University of California, Berkeley.

Welcome Alex!

yahoosports:

It’s a Mad, Mad World.  The Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo SportsBy Ken Fuchs, VP/Group Lead Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Finance and Product PartnershipsWe felt the rush of the buzzer beaters, Cinderellas and win-or-go-home, but that just wasn’t enough for the annual feast that is the Tourney.  This year, we decided to ratchet up the heat by teaming with Quicken Loans and Warren Buffett to try and give someone a billion dollars.  If you’re one of the first 15 million people to sign up for the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo Sports by Thursday, March 20 at 1:00 a.m. as an eligible player and predict the winner of every single tournament game, you could be America’s next billionaire.  Don’t worry — even if you blow it on the first game of the tourney, you could still have a shot at $2 million of guaranteed prizes.  See official Challenge Rules for more info.To help you with those perfect picks, Yahoo Sports will provide up-to-the-second news, data, advice and research from our award-winning Bracketologists Pat Forde, Brad Evans and Jeff Eisenberg. You can get all that, plus fill out your bracket, play against your friends, track the games, follow your school, get instant reactions and enter the Challenge right from the Yahoo Sports apps on iOS and Android Smartphones. While you watch, you can also share your own shining moments by creating Loops with special effects and captions.Finally – if you really want to be a player — join the Celebrity Bracket Challenge with four All-Stars and former college phenoms (including one national champion) — Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh, Paul George or Chris Paul.  They will have pools only in the Celebrity Bracket Challenge on Yahoo Sports Tourney Pick’em, so now is your chance to take on the pros.Selection Sunday is less than two weeks away, so it’s time to start researching tournament trends, bracket busters and this year’s hottest teams.  What would you do with a billion dollars?  Join the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo Sports and start dreaming.
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yahoosports:

It’s a Mad, Mad World.  The Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo Sports

By Ken Fuchs, VP/Group Lead Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Finance and Product Partnerships

We felt the rush of the buzzer beaters, Cinderellas and win-or-go-home, but that just wasn’t enough for the annual feast that is the Tourney.  This year, we decided to ratchet up the heat by teaming with Quicken Loans and Warren Buffett to try and give someone a billion dollars.  

If you’re one of the first 15 million people to sign up for the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo Sports by Thursday, March 20 at 1:00 a.m. as an eligible player and predict the winner of every single tournament game, you could be America’s next billionaire.  Don’t worry — even if you blow it on the first game of the tourney, you could still have a shot at $2 million of guaranteed prizes.  See official Challenge Rules for more info.

To help you with those perfect picks, Yahoo Sports will provide up-to-the-second news, data, advice and research from our award-winning Bracketologists Pat Forde, Brad Evans and Jeff Eisenberg. You can get all that, plus fill out your bracket, play against your friends, track the games, follow your school, get instant reactions and enter the Challenge right from the Yahoo Sports apps on iOS and Android Smartphones. While you watch, you can also share your own shining moments by creating Loops with special effects and captions.

Finally – if you really want to be a player — join the Celebrity Bracket Challenge with four All-Stars and former college phenoms (including one national champion) — Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh, Paul George or Chris Paul.  They will have pools only in the Celebrity Bracket Challenge on Yahoo Sports Tourney Pick’em, so now is your chance to take on the pros.
Selection Sunday is less than two weeks away, so it’s time to start researching tournament trends, bracket busters and this year’s hottest teams.  

What would you do with a billion dollars?  Join the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge with Yahoo Sports and start dreaming.

Happy Birthday Yahoo!

It’s been an amazing 19 years, and I’m so incredibly proud of what Yahoo is today.

Whether you’re searching the web, sending email, checking the weather, sharing photos, watching videos, getting sports scores, tumbling, checking stocks or reading the news, we strive to make your daily habits inspiring and entertaining.

Thank you for inspiring us and coming to Yahoo everyday. 

- David Filo, co-founder of Yahoo

Introducing Yahoo Gemini

The first unified ad marketplace for mobile search and native advertising

By Jay Rossiter, SVP of Cloud Platform Group, and Adam Cahan, SVP of Mobile and Emerging Products

When advertising appears seamlessly and naturally, it creates a more enjoyable experience for users, increases engagement and improves performance for advertisers. This is why we continue to work hard to roll out new, more innovative native ad formats on Yahoo. Native advertising is the sponsored twin of content  — while the ads are clearly marked, they look and act just like the other stories on the page. 

Today, we are excited to introduce Yahoo Gemini, the first unified marketplace for mobile search and native advertising. With Yahoo Gemini, advertisers get the performance and ease of search, combined with the scale and creativity of native advertising.  By bringing the two together, advertisers can now buy, manage and optimize their mobile search and native ad spend in one place — driving greater performance and higher impact for their businesses and brands.

And to make it even easier for advertisers, Yahoo Gemini is available through our existing self-service buying platform, Yahoo Ad Manager. 

Mobile is the fastest-growing market segment, and we have innovated how our users communicate, consume content and search for information across multiple devices. We are equally committed to building products that simplify the buying process and improve the experience for advertisers.  Yahoo Gemini is the latest way we are helping advertisers reach millions of people directly on their mobile devices with smart, integrated, multi-channel campaigns. 

More Transparency For U.S. National Security Requests

You may have heard that the U.S. government issued a new policy last week that lets Internet providers disclose more about the U.S. national security requests they receive. Yahoo and other tech companies fought vigorously in court for the right to share such information. We’re pleased that the Department of Justice has embraced the compelling need for greater disclosure.

In light of the new policy, we’re updating the disclosures we provided to you in Yahoo’s first global transparency report last September with more detailed information about the number of U.S. national security requests we receive. As we said then, the number of Yahoo accounts specified in global government data requests comprised less than one one-hundredth of one percent (<.01%) of our worldwide user base for the reporting period.

The U.S. government limits how we can report its national security requests. For example, such requests must be reported in ranges, rather than in exact numbers, and information about requests made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) must be delayed six months. (You can read the government’s reporting limitations here. We’ve adopted the disclosure option that lets us provide the most information to you about both the type and number of requests we get.)

The numbers reported below represent the number of U.S. national security requests received by Yahoo that were effective during the reporting period and the number of accounts about which data was sought. This is the maximum amount of detail that the U.S. government allows.

Reporting period: January 1 – June 30, 2013

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Reporting period: July 1 – December 31, 2013

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FISA Requests are compulsory legal process reviewed and approved by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that require companies to disclose information about their users in national security investigations.

  • FISA Requests for Disclosure of Content may be used to get content that users create, communicate, and store on or through our services. This could include, for example, words in an email or instant message, photos on Flickr, Yahoo Address Book or Calendar entries and similar kinds of information.
  • FISA Requests for Disclosure of Non-Content Data (NCD) are limited to NCD such as alternate e-mail address, name, location, and IP address, login details, billing information, and other transactional information (e.g., “to,” “from,” and “date” fields from email headers).

NSLs are national security requests approved by the Federal Bureau of Investigation that require companies to disclose information such as the names, addresses and length of service of their users. They may not be used to request content.

The Number of Accounts is typically larger than the number of users and accounts involved because an individual user may have multiple accounts that were specified in one or more requests, and if a request specified an account that does not exist, that nonexistent account would nevertheless be included in our count.

What’s next?

As always, Yahoo will continue to protect the privacy of our users and to ensure our ability to defend it. This includes advocating strenuously for meaningful reform around government surveillance, demanding that government requests be made through lawful means and for lawful purposes, and fighting government requests that we deem unclear, improper, overbroad, or unlawful.

Yahoo updates its full global transparency report every six months and will update it again in the next few months. We’re also pleased to share with you that our colleagues at tumblr released their first global transparency report today too.

By Ron Bell, General Counsel, and Aaron Altschuler, Associate General Counsel, Law Enforcement and Security